Politics

Trump Leads Biden in 6 of 7 Swing States: WSJ Poll

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OPINION: This article may contain commentary which reflects the author’s opinion.


President Joe Biden’s campaign continues to receive bad electoral news from the most important swing states the deeper the nation enters the election cycle.

A CNN segment on Tuesday pointed out that Biden is behind former President Donald Trump in six of seven swing states—Arizona, Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Georgia—while Biden leads by three points in Wisconsin.

What’s more, Trump is leading Biden on issues that are also the biggest concerns for voters this cycle.

“Look at the why: what is going on?  Alright, trusted more, again, this is across all of these key seven swing states,” CNN political analyst Harry Enten said.

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“Look, Donald Trump is trusted more than Joe Biden in basically all the important issues — the economy, inflation, 20-point lead, immigration, border, 20-point lead, the Israel-Hamas war, 14-point lead, the Russia-Ukraine war, nine-point lead, protecting democracy, well within the margin of error, which I think is something the that should worry that Biden camp, given that has been harping and Democrats been harping on this,” Enten continued. “Just a one-point advantage.

“On abortion, Democrats and Joe Biden have a 12-point advantage. They would love this campaign to be about abortion, but at this particular point, it‘s about this. And it‘s about this with perhaps a little bit of this,” Enten said, pointing out the main concerns of voters, “and all these issues favor Donald Trump.”

The host pointed out that Democrats and Biden have been “running on protecting democracy, and that’s a wash right now.”

“It is a Wash. And this is not the only poll that shows…  was looking at a Quinnipiac University poll last month, last week, excuse me, that showed the same thing,” Enten said. “And it‘s something that RFK Jr. said to our colleague, Erin Burnett, saying, I‘m not quite sure — Joe Biden may be worse for protecting democracy. It turns out a lot of voters agree on that.

“One little last thing I‘ll point out — is the U.S. on the right track or wrong track of presidential elections? Right track, 25 percent average when the president’s party loses since 1980 — 25% (now for Biden). It looks very much that type of campaign that we‘ve seen before right now,” Enten concluded.

WATCH:

Trump’s increasing appeal to blue-collar workers will likely be put to the test in Michigan this year, home to the country’s auto industry.

In January, just days after United Auto Workers union President Shawn Fain said the organization was formally endorsing Biden’s reelection, he dropped a bombshell during a live Fox News interview about the preferred candidate for most members.

He appeared to suggest it would be Trump.

After Fain fielded some questions about the slumping sales of electric vehicles and how that could affect the union labor force moving forward, host Neil Cavuto noted that in past decades, sizeable numbers of UAW members supported President Ronald Reagan and his successor, President George H. W. Bush, as well as other Republican presidents through the years.

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Cavuto then went on to point out that many UAW members were supportive of Trump in 2016 and 2020 and remain supportive of him now before asking Fain how he felt about that.

“Look, it’s democracy in action,” the UAW boss began. “Let me be clear about this: A great majority of our members will not vote for President Biden. Yeah, some will, but that’s the reality of this. The majority of our members are gonna vote for their paychecks. They’re gonna vote for an economy that works for them.”

While Fain did not say that the “great majority” would be voting for Trump, that was the impression he gave since Cavuto had just mentioned past UAW rank-and-file support for previous Republican presidents.

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