Politics

Is It Over? New National Survey Shows Trump With Huge Lead Over Haley

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OPINION: This article may contain commentary which reflects the author’s opinion.


The 2024 GOP primary news for Nikki Haley continues to get worse the longer she stays in the race.

According to a recent nationwide survey of 1,297 potential Republican primary voters conducted by Morning Consult last week, former President Donald Trump is favored by 81 percent of respondents, while his one-time UN ambassador, Haley, receives support from only 18 percent of voters.

This significant gap represents a deficit of 63 points and seems insurmountable at this point.

In the previous poll conducted by Morning Consult, Trump had the support of 79 percent of likely GOP voters ahead of the New Hampshire primary, compared to Haley’s 20 percent.

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But despite facing losses in the first two primaries in Iowa and New Hampshire, Haley, a former South Carolina governor, has stated her intention to stay in the race.

“New Hampshire is first in the nation. It is not the last in the nation. This race is far from over,” she said following that state’s primary on Tuesday. “The road is never going to stop here in New Hampshire. That’s always been the plan.”

“Most Americans do not want a rematch between Biden and Trump,” Haley added. “The first party to retire its 80-year-old candidate is going to be the party that wins this election. And I think it should be the Republicans that win this election.”

Meanwhile, President Joe Biden is facing worse reelection prospects than any other incumbent president over the past three decades, according to a new report that dropped this week.

According to Gallup, fewer than 4 in 10 people surveyed want to see Biden get another term, according to the Washington Examiner, which is the lowest rating in 32 years, the pollster said, adding that is lower than his 41 percent approval rating.

“The gloomy results for the liberal president follow several other polls showing him losing to former President Donald Trump, though many of those polls show that voters don’t want either to return to the White House,” the Examiner added, citing the results.

“However, Gallup did offer a glimmer of hope for the incumbent. The survey firm made the case that a couple of other recent presidents who were underwater in polling leading to an election won, though none were as undeserving as Biden is,” the outlet added.

Gallup’s analysis noted: “In January of prior incumbent reelection years, Gallup asked whether former Presidents Donald Trump, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush deserved reelection. The same question was asked about George W. Bush (October 2003) and Barack Obama (December 2011) late in the years before they sought reelection.

Gallup added: “Of these, the younger Bush (who won reelection) had the highest reelect figure, at 53%, while two incumbents who lost, Trump at 50% and the elder Bush at 49%, scored just below. Although Biden’s current rating ranks lowest among the readings for the past six presidents, his 38% is most similar to Clinton’s 44% and Obama’s 43%, both of whom won a second term.”

The survey found that voters have an even lower opinion of Congress, with just 24 percent believing they should be reelected. That said, as expected, 55 percent said their representatives and senators should be.

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The pollster concluded:

“Voters are not enthusiastic about returning most elected federal officials to office. Biden trails other incumbents at similar points in their presidencies, and voters are less likely than in other recent election years to say members of Congress deserve reelection.”

“While the numbers for Congress are unlikely to improve, based on historical patterns, Biden’s numbers could. He hopes to follow the paths of Clinton and Obama, whose electoral fortunes improved during their reelection years and saw them win second terms, rather than those of Trump and the elder George Bush, whose support for a second term deteriorated over the course of the election year.”

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